Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Eggs-pert Audience Participation Very First Game!!



Are these good eggs or bad eggs?

Jump in and give me your thoughts, please!! This will be fun, but only if you participate...The best of the answers, received within 24 hours will be posted, so please send your entry as a comment to this blog post. I have a few days of this egg-citing game planned so jump in early and often, please!!

Today's Game: Compare these two clutches.

The top full clutch of five beautiful glossy eggs belong to a Stafford pair, where the hen is ready to be set today, to the bottom dull looking Border eggs that I am in the process of collecting, the third egg being laid this morning.

Check out the comments to see the BEST of the Bloggers!

5 comments:

Crumbly Moist said...

Hi Linda,

I must confess that I never take much notice as to whether eggs have a "gloss" or "matt" finish when I set them and it certainly hadn't occurred to me that it may indicate fertility or infertility.
I think I would prefer to wait and see, I certainly wouldn't discard eggs on the presence or absence of a sheen.

Anyway, to the eggs. The only thing I notice about the top eggs is that the contents seem to be lower half, with the top half tranparent, indicating something seriously wrong, but maybe it's just the shadow.

AS said...

Linda,

I think the top 5 eggs are unfertile since they have not lost their glossy look. The botton 3 eggs, in my opinion should be fertile since they look more dull.

Luis Sorto

AS said...

Linda,

I think the top 5 eggs are unfertile since they have not lost their glossy look. The botton 3 eggs, in my opinion should be fertile since they look more dull.

Luis Sorto

Rw2 said...

Three good eggs, five bad eggs.

The nest with three eggs should produce chicks. The membrane growing around the inside of the shell makes them more opaque. The shiny eggs are not fertile.

Linda Hogan said...

Great Job Bloggers!!

You are absolutely right, glossy eggs is a bad sign and when incubated will not be fertile!

The first impression of the opaque bottom eggs is they will likely be fertile! When a hen lays her first glossy egg, I kick it up a bite with making sure she gets a dish of bee pollen free choice (pricey so for most it is added to seed mix), greens like seedy chick weed heads, petamine mixed 50/50 with Harrison's, and breeder's yeast mixed with wheat germ.

If all her eggs are glossy like these, I let her sit a week and then start her back on the vitamin E in the water weekly treatment to re-cycle her.

Linda